Every location has a story. Let’s connect them online

Where there is a place, there is a story. In cities public places have a story of coexistence and connection.

I’ve long been hooked on connecting location information online with images, links and info. For years I have been using location apps such as Foursquare Swarm and Yelp to check into places, leaving a photo and an account. I’ve recently been inpsired by Jane’s Walks about neighbourhoods, the city building hash tag #2forTO, and an app I tried in San Francisco. The Detour App took things to a new level by offering audio/visual location tours that direct one to places not even imagined.

As a personal project, I created profile accounts in social media of a few local places in a consistent fashion. Profiles are different from a daily stream of events you typically find in social media. A profile offers basic info, a quick glimpse of what the topic is, and then links to more information on the web.

Below are the accounts I set up for people online to connect about a location while passing through. They are a spot for myself and others to put topical tips and media. For now they are simply profiles with a link to Wikipedia so one may learn more. I’m reaching out to others to profile here as well such as @StClairWestTO.

I wish the city would own these digital footprints so we could all move through our digital space more easily. By that I mean, common names would be registered and link to further resources. I rather the account names be ones about a location and not a dormant user account that has nothing to do with the location such as @CollegeStTO and @BloorSt on Twitter.

Visualizing my data

Where I Went
Foursquare checkins

From 2013, but what you see is mostly of my time in Montreal working on contract coordinating the redesign of Concordia’s website and social media.

Some of What I Said
Twitter infographics and top tweets of @matthewburpee

A Bit of What I Saw

My Foursquare Stats

My Social Network

A slideshow showing meta data from my facebook, twitter and other networks. Select for more info.

Should staff tweet as themselves?

Who Tweets for you?
Who Tweets for you? By Andrea Berry

Should staff tweet as themselves or should you just have a main handle that directly represents the business organization?

The answer is not definitive but a mix and match from the options below. Source: Who Tweets for you? By Andrea Berry of idealware.org, May 2012.

  • Institutional: Branding the business or a department as an authority. Pro: clear organizational branding allowing for multiple managers. Con: loss of personal feel.
  • Spokesperson: Branding the community around the business or a department. In this case multiple people tweet as themselves, but clearly represent the business. Pro: you get the best of all worlds. Con: it is a lot of work!
  • Expert: Branding a single individual as an expert in a certain area (but you also care that there is an immediate connection to your department). Pro: real person with a organizational connection. Con: just one personality, what if there are more people? What if that person leaves?
  • Personal: Branding a single individual as an expert in a certain area (without caring if there is an immediate connection to Concordia). Pro: real person feel. Con: little connection with organization.

 

(This is reposted from an internal blog by Matthew Burpee)